Reflections: FedBar Indian Law Conference and ICRA Symposium

I attended the Federal Bar Association Annual Indian Law Conference. At the dinner reception, I was placed next a woman tribal leader. During our conversation, she asked where I was from and, when she found out that I attend UNM School of Law, if I had attended the 50th ICRA symposium. We then began a... Continue Reading →

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Reflections on the ICRA Symposium

I was the timekeeper for the “Indigenous Civil, Cultural, Political, and Human Rights: E/Merging Issues” panel hosted by Prof. Christine Zuni-Cruz.  I did not know what to expect, truthfully, but I can say that by the time the panel discussion was over, I was a bit shaken.  Each speaker spoke of the profound effects both... Continue Reading →

Indian Blood: A Presentation

On November 8, 2017 the UNM Native American Law Student Association, in collaboration with the State Bar of New Mexico Indian Law Section, hosted a lecture titled “Indian Blood.”  The event–covering a very important and often controversial issue–received overwhelming attention throughout the state and beyond.  The lecture was well attended, filling the largest UNM Law... Continue Reading →

Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women Vigil

Community members gathered on a chilly fall day to honor the lives of the many indigenous women who have been murdered or gone missing. On October 27, 2017, indigenous women from four local organizations (First Nations Community Healthsource, Planned Parenthood, Albuquerque Indian Health Board, and Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women) held a vigil... Continue Reading →

Historical Trauma and Healing from Boarding School Abuse

From the 1890s to the 1970s, the U.S. government sought to “Christianize” Native Americans by separating children from their Native culture, which ultimately led to one of the darkest chapters in Native American history: boarding schools.[1] Many Native American children suffered from both physical and emotional abuse while attending boarding schools, which has given rise... Continue Reading →

Taking Time for Diversity

I took a trip through the Pueblo of Isleta today on my way to a meeting. I was amazed at how much I have forgotten – the beauty and uniqueness of the pueblo, the strength of the people who live there and have lived there for so long, and the richness of the history and... Continue Reading →

“How Tribal Self Determination May Save Civilization” – A Seminar by Hon. Randolph Collins & Hon. William Bluehouse Johnson

On October 10-13, 2017, the National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA) held its 48th Annual National Tribal Judicial and Court Personnel Conference at the Isleta Resort and Casino. The theme of the conference was “Tribal Justice: Building and Strengthening Relationships and Partnerships.” NAICJA organized the conference for its members and networks of multiple Tribal... Continue Reading →

Reparations for Forced Adoptions in Canada

The Canadian Government announced Friday, October 6, 2017, that it would pay 750 million Canadian dollars in reparations for its forced adoption program of native children.[1]  Part of the reparations is a settlement of an Ontario class action lawsuit that was decided in February after eight years of litigation.[2]  The forced adoption program ran in... Continue Reading →

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