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Former Editorial Boards

Co-Editor in Chief: Yarrow Allaire

Yarrow Allaire is a third-year law student at the University of New Mexico School of Law and has lived most of her life in Albuquerque’s South Valley. Prior to law school, Yarrow taught high school social studies in McAllen, Texas, and Santa Fe, New Mexico. Yarrow is perusing a certificate in Indian Law. She is very excited to graduate soon and begin working as an attorney for the people of New Mexico. When she is not at school, Yarrow enjoys growing vegetables in her garden, and spending time with her dogs.

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Former Editorial Boards

Citations Editor: Paige Diem

Paige Diem, a third-year law student, has been selected to be the Citations Editor for the Tribal Law Journal in the 2019-2020 school year. Prior to law school, Paige acquired a bachelor’s in fine arts with a focus in metal sculpture and worked for a Santa Fe art gallery as a Program Coordinator for three years. Paige continues to weld metal sculpture today. The creativity she has developed with her background in art allows her to bring a unique perspective on the law. She is passionate about helping others find their own voice.

Paige is also the Vice President of Lambda at UNM SOL. She has lived in New Mexico for fourteen years and has a deep respect for the legal systems, traditions and history of various tribes in New Mexico and beyond. Participation in the Tribal Law Journal continues to enrich Paige’s life through friendships and engaging research. She is proud to be part of the Tribal Law Journal team and honored to act as Citations Editor in her second year on the journal.

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Former Editorial Boards

Co-Editor in Chief: Jordan Oglesby

Jordan Oglesby (Diné) is a member of the Navajo Nation from Shiprock, New Mexico. She received her B.B.A. with a concentration in Finance from the University of New Mexico in 2017 and is currently a third-year law student at the University of New Mexico School of Law. After attending PLSI through the American Indian Law Center, Inc. in 2017, she subsequently served as a PLSI Teaching Assistant in 2018. Jordan is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Tribal Law Journal and the National NALSA Public Relations Director. She is pursuing an Indian Law Certificate and plans to use her law degree to focus on missing and murdered Indigenous women as well as supporting sustainable economic development in Indian Country.

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Former Editorial Boards

Managing Editor: Carmen V. Borja

Carmen is a current 3L. She is TLJ’s Managing Editor and Media Editor. Carmen’s role includes assisting the Co-Editor in Chiefs, managing the journal’s blog/media, and participating in all journal matters. Carmen joined TLJ because she is interested in many different avenues of the law that intersect with indigenous people and land.

Carmen is Chamorro from the island of Saipan located in the Northern Mariana Islands. After she graduated high school from Saipan Southern High School, she went on to pursue a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of Washington. Although she does not know what type of law she will specialize in, she will return back to her island after law school. She loves to watch Korean drama and eat Japanese food.

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Former Editorial Boards

Multimedia Editor: Kaythee Hlaing

Kaythee Hlaing is a second-year student at UNM School of Law. She expects to graduate in the spring of 2019.  Currently, a staff member of the Tribal Law Journal, she will start her new position as the Multimedia Editor. Having worked as a photojournalist in a prior life to law school, she looks forward to contributing to the journal’s work with her past experience.

Kaythee initially “discovered” the completely new (to her) and fascinating world of tribal law when she took “Legal Research” – a mandatory class.  Wanting to learn more and do more, she applied to join the Tribal Law Journal. Her experience at the Journal has been all that and more—it has been a challenging yet nurturing environment within which to learn.  The editors and faculty advisors have made being a staff of the Journal like being in a family, an experience not everyone is lucky enough to get, especially in law school!

This semester, the Journal was heavily involved in making UNM’s symposium on the 50th Anniversary of ICRA a reality.  The symposium was truly a case-in-point exercise of the Journal’s work in that it holds a forum in which scholars, academics, and community members come together to talk frankly about the issues and forward solutions.  Next semester, Kaythee is hoping to use her skills as a journalist and law student to highlight and provide exposure to tribal legal issues.

Kaythee is not a member of a North American tribe but is originally from Burma, where her mother was a member of the Karen Tribe.  Prior to law school, she was a photojournalist working for an international aid agency working inside Burma.  Her favorite TLJ blog article is “Sounds that Heal the Soul,” an article about when TLJ brought a drum circle to the law school.  The article highlights the Journal’s work: the Journal does things out of the “mainstream” box, things that are not expected but are really older than the mainstream itself.  The Journal is a kind of conduit to remind and inform people of the traditions and solutions tribal cultures possess. Because of the way our country is structured, the study and practice of law is crucial to the protection and perhaps even better understanding of tribal law and cultural practices.

Kaythee feels very fortunate to have this family and experience at the Journal. She is scheduled to begin the clinical experience in the Southwest Indian Law Clinic. While she is not sure what area of law she will be practicing after graduation, the varied and rich experience with the Journal has given her a wider perspective on the practice of law.  Because of these experiences, she will not graduate with tunnel-vision of what it is to be a lawyer.  And for these things, she is grateful.

Fun Facts: Kaythee’s favorite Supreme Court Justice is Ruth Bader-Ginsberg. Her favorite New Mexico Supreme Court Justice is Mary Walters.