About

The Tribal Law Journal was established in fall 1998 for the purpose of promoting indigenous self-determination by facilitating discussion of the internal law of the world’s indigenous nations. The internal law of indigenous nations encompasses traditional law, western law adopted by indigenous nations, and a blend of western and indigenous law. Underscoring this purpose is the recognition that traditional law is a source of law.

Since the Tribal Law Journal’s inception, the Tribal Law Journal has become the premier indigenous law journal in the United States and is one of the few international legal journal sources dedicated to indigenous and tribal law.

This Journal provides native peoples, practitioners, and law students an opportunity to contribute their work to the discussion relating to internal indigenous law. Contributions include, but are not limited to, tribal court case comments, reflections on tribal systems, the development of tribal law, the value of tribal law, interviews, and teachings. Submission requirements can be found at http://lawschool.unm.edu/tlj/submission/index.html.

The Tribal Law Journal is strictly an on-line forum hosted through the University of New Mexico School of Law which provides free access and the opportunity for comment and discussion about journal items. In addition, an on-line forum provides a variety of media to best capture indigenous thought and expression. Publications can be found in Issues.

This is a student run blog for the Tribal Law Journal at the University of New Mexico School of Law. The blog posts are written by staff members of the Tribal Law Journal who are second or third year law students. The posts cover a variety of topics including tribal court case comments, reflections on tribal systems, the development of tribal law, the value of tribal law, interviews, and teachings. For posts written prior to the Fall of 2017 please see the previous blog at http://unm-tlj.tumblr.com/.